Talbot Inn, Borough High Street, 1810

Talbot Inn, Borough High Street, 1810
Formerly The Tabard Inn, the rendezvous of Chaucer’s Canterbury Pilgrims. Next door to The George in Talbot Yard and the starting point of coaches to Brighton and the south coast. Demolished in 1873. For more details see The Brighton Road, The Classic Highway to the South by Charles G Harper.
Drawing by George Shepherd from the British Museum and used with permission under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license. Original © Trustees of the British Museum.

Hackney Station, 1851

Hackney Station, 1851
From “The Camden-Town Railway”, The Illustrated London News, Nov 15th 1851, page 603.
We have now arrived at the Hackney Station. On the right, from the midst of roofs of houses and the thickly-planted trees in the churchyard and adjacent gardens, rises the picturesque tower of the old church; and to the right, the pyramidal tower of the new church. Looking leftward, we were somewhat puzzled at the appearance of several long ditches, or rather trenches, filled with running water, nearly covered with what we took to be weeds; but, upon inquiry, we found this was one of the artificial streams for the continual growth of watercresses for the London market, which affords a living to a great number of poor men, women, and children.

St James’s Royal Hotel, 1820

St James's Royal Hotel, 1820
At number 76 [Jermyn Street] stood until 1940 Hammum’s Hotel and Turkish Baths, opened about 1860 as the London and Provincial Turkish Bath Company. Hammum’s occupied the site of the former St James’s Hotel, and here Sir Walter Scott lodged for some time after his return from the continent in 1832, setting out on 7 July for Abbotsford, where he died on 21 September.
From The Face of London by Howard Clunn

Columbia Market, Bethnal Green, 1869

Columbia Market, Bethnal Green, 1869
From the Illustrated London News, May 1, 1869, page 440
According to A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 11, Stepney, Bethnal Green: In 1864 Henry Darbishire (who became an architect for the Peabody Trust) began the magnificent Columbia Market buildings in the style of a French Gothic cathedral. Opened in 1869, they included dwellings for shopkeepers.
More details can be found here.